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Lisa Wade, Ph D, a professor of sociology at Occidental College who studies gender roles in college dating, explains that we're now seeing a hookup culture in which young people exhibit a preference for behaviors coded .

Most of my peers would say "You go, girl" to a young woman who is career-focused, athletically competitive, or interested in casual sex. " when a guy "feels liberated enough to learn to knit, decide to be a stay-at-home dad, or learn ballet," Wade says.

College is supposed to be the best four years of your life.

With that said, I don’t think everyone HAS to do this to get the “complete college experience.” I live in a dorm, I stay up all night to study, I starve, I overeat, I’m poor, I make new friends nearly every day, etc. If you’re looking for a time in your life to be free, do what you want and be single, then college is that time.

But if you’re already in a happy and committed relationship, you shouldn’t feel like you to break up with that person just because you’re going to school.

And when someone does want a relationship, they downplay it.

This leads to awkward, sub-text-laden conversations, of which I've been on both sides."The great irony is that no one seems to enjoy playing the whoever-cares-less-wins game.

Basically being single, meeting people, dating around. I’m more on the pro-spotlight of college experience actually.

Even if they’re happy with someone, they need to experience more people for it to be a “complete college experience”. I have two friends who dated for two years in secondary school.

reporter Alex Williams, who argues in his article "The End of Courtship?

I'm lured in by these trend pieces and their sexy headlines and consistently let down by their conclusions about my generation's moral depravity, narcissism, and distaste for true love. Instead, I armed myself with a blasé smile and answered, "Just text me to let me know what's up. " Sure, I wanted a plan for when we were supposed to hang out but felt I needed to meet Nate on his level of vagueness. to ask "What's up" (no question mark — that would seem too desperate). When I saw him in class, he glanced away whenever we made eye contact. Instead, he said that he thought I was "really attractive and bright" but he just hadn't been interested in dating me. So to avoid seeming or any of the related stereotypes commonly pegged on women, I followed Nate's immature lead: I walked away to get a beer and dance with my friends. This anecdote sums up a pattern I have experienced, observed, and heard about from almost all my college-age friends.

Men and women are both partaking in Guyland's culture of silence on college campuses, which results in what Wade calls the whoever-cares-less-wins dynamic.

We all know it: When the person you hooked up with the night before walks toward you in the dining hall, you try not to look excited... When it comes to dating, it always feels like the person who cares less ends up winning.

No., Michael Kimmel, Ph D, explores the world of young men between adolescence and adulthood, including the college years.