benefits of dating a single mother Congolese dating site

Set up your FREE profile today and instantly explore thousands of profiles, browse images, send flirts, and start connecting with attractive local singles!Interested in meeting fellow Congolese in South Africa?An older woman asked me: “How many mixed cultured couples do you know who have grown old together?

I would prefer to date someone from the same country as me.

It’s just easier.” Bridgette (25) Congolese “I don’t mind as long as I am happy and loved, that is all that matters.” Dora (28), Zimbabwe Immerse within your own culture What I found was that those who immersed themselves exclusively in their own culture (i.e mono-cultural churches, parties, gatherings) – even if they lived in a very mixed society abroad – were the ones who were adamant that it was easier and preferable to date within their own culture.

And why was it better to date a white person rather than another African?

Some field digging I did a bit of digging to get the views of other people of African origin on intercultural dating.

Outside our homes, we spoke the same street language, ate the same type of food, listened to the same type of music and were attracted to the same type of guys (or girls).

There were no cultural preferences, except they had to speak English and couldn’t be a “freshie” (someone who’s recently moved to the UK from Africa). However, as I got older and continued to date people from other countries, I realised there was always a barrier in the way, almost like a culture clash, and language, I felt, was the ultimate clash as it is one of the key markers of culture.

Language “The problem is language; it’s the major issue” 36-year-old Alexi from Congo told me.

“For most of us English is not our first language, we think in our mother tongue then translate it into English.

If you can communicate with someone in a language that you both feel comfortable with, it makes being with that person easier.

In Africa, those who speak the same language have a similar culture.

Love blinds common sense.” “No Nigerian, Ghanaian or Jamaican man is welcome in my house. Why is it better for me to be with a white man than it is to be with a Nigerian? How many marriages do you know of people from two different African countries that have lasted till old age? I pondered those phrases: “It’s for your own good” and “stick to your own”.