1950s educational films dating

These contributors add considerably to the knowledge about the structure and organizations of the Third Reich newsreel empire, newsreel production history, and, most important, a consideration of newsreel reception.

: on film history as intellectual history / Thomas Koebner -- The double, the decor, and the framing device: once more on Robert Wiene's The cabinet of Dr. The Role of Screen Heroines in GDR Cinema." In: Triangulated visions: women in recent German cinema / edited by Ingeborg Majer O'Sickey and Ingeborg von Zadow. Just recently, in June 2003, the first 100 hours of German newsreels were put on the Internet for research purposes, which was made possible through the cooperation of selected archives, copyright owners, and the DEFA foundation; a fourth of these newsreels are before 1945.

Caligari / Dietrich Scheunemann -- Film as graphic art: on Karl Heinz Martin's From morn to midnight / Jurgen Kasten -- Episodic patchwork: the bric-a-brac principle in Paul Leni's Waxworks / Jurgen Kasten -- Entrapment and escape: readings of the city in Karl Grune's The street and G. Pabst's The joyless street / Anthony Coulson -- Fragmenting the space: on E. Dupont's Variete / Thomas Brandlmeier -- On Murnau's Faust: a generic Gesamtkunstwerk? The Democratic Spirit of the Weimar Cinema / Mimi Tennyson Goss.[Cambridge, Mass.]: Research Programs, John F. Tauris, 2002."Gender, film, and German history: filmmaking by German women directors from Weimar to the present." In: Facing fascism and confronting the past: German women writers from Weimar to the present / edited by Elke P. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, c2000. Series title: Contemporary film and television studies and readers. New York: Twayne; Toronto: Maxwell Macmillan Canada; New York: Maxwell Macmillan International, 1992. "The Demonization of the Home Front: War Neurosis and Weimar Cinema." In: Dancing on the volcano: essays on the culture of the Weimar Republic / edited by Thomas W. In recent years, in various countries like Belgium, Norway, France, and Luxembourg, an intense study of the German newsreels for the occupied countries has been done. New York: Twayne; Toronto: Maxwell Macmillan Canada; New York: Maxwell Macmillan International, 1992.

The Weimar cinema was considered as an avant-garde involving figures such as Hans Richter, Walter Ruttmann and Lotte Reiniger.

The transition of the Weimar cinema to Nazi cinema was influenced by modernism.

If the message was not overt in feature film, it was in newsreels, which from late 1938 formed a compulsory part of the cinema program, as was also later the case in occupied Europe.

During the war, it reached large numbers as cinema attendance was very high.This genre reflected the need of a people in a specific situation at a specific period in time." [Art Abstracts] "Down These Seen Streets A Man Must Go: Siegfried Kracauer, Hollywood's Terror Films and the Spatiality of Film Noir." New German Critique: An Interdisciplinary Journal of German Studies. One reason for their popularity is their attempt to replace reason with subtle fantasies.In the so-called Weimar Germany period, the cinema formed a part of popular culture.This genre involved Germany's own attempt to come to terms with the war and Nazism, and the film reached back past the vulgarity and kitsch of Nazi film to the period of classical German cinema of the 1920s, the Expressionist era, where the crooked streets and painted shadows of Expressionism have become reality in Germany's ruined cities.The Trummerfilm died out in the 1950s with the onslaught of the Cold War and the division of Germany. "History played a role in the popularity of Nazi entertainment films.Another contributory to the German cinema's success was its sound technology which replaced most of the silent films." [Expanded Academic Index] "The recent expansion of the German film industry is not merely a market effect of globalization, but also involves a process of conscious transnationalism.